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Words of the Week

 

Date English Word of the Week 

Maths Word of the Week 

19th April
Word of the week - FLORA 

 

Meaning the plants of a particular region.

 

We went to the beach to find the different flora in the area. 

 

Synonyms - plants, flowers

 

 

Etymology - it comes from the Roman goddess of flowers and Flos meaning flowers. 

 

 

Word of the week - Odd and Even  

 

An even number is a number that can be divided into two equal groups.

 

An odd number is :

A number that cannot be divided into two equal groups 

 

 

12th April 
Word of the week - NIMBLE 

 

Nimble means quick and light in movement or action. 

 

The nimble hamster enjoyed running on his wheel.

 

Synonyms: agile, light footed. 

Antonyms: stiff, clumsy, lumbering. 

 

It comes from the old English (1300) nemel, meaning quick at taking. 

 

 

22nd March
Word of the week - DISGRUNTLED

 

Meaning to be angry or dissatisfied

 

He turned and climbed back down the stairs, obviously disgruntled , but not arguing further.
 
Synonyms : angry, grumpy
Antonyms: happy, cheery 
 
Etymology: it comes from the Old English grunt, meaning to grumble and moan about something. 

 

15th March

Word of the week - BLOOMED

Bloom means the process of becoming a flower or to grow well.


The beautiful blossom trees bloomed overnight.
 

After a week in the classroom the children bloomed.

Synonyms: flower, open, grow.

Antonyms: wither, fade

 

Etymology: it comes from the old Norse ‘blomi’ meaning to grow.

 

8th March

Word of the week - AMBITIOUS

 

Meaning to have the determination to succeed.

 

The two ambitious children never stopped following their dreams. 

 

Synonym – determined, forceful

Antonym – Unambitious, lazy

 

It comes from the old French, meaning to want to be honoured. 

 

22nd February

Word of the week - LOCATE

 

Meaning to find

 

'Please locate your pencil case and paper, we can then begin,' said the teacher in the Teams meeting.

 

Synonym: find, discover, detect.

Antonym: lose, displace

 

Etymology: It comes from the Latin locates, meaning to put something somewhere.

 

8th February 
Word of the week - GABBLE

 

This means to talk rapidly and unintelligibly.
 
'He gabbled his way through the meeting.'

 

Synonyms: Babble, blabber, jabber

Anonyms: articulate

 

It comes from the 1570'd word 'Gab', this meant to talk noisily. 

 

1st February
Word of the week - IRKSOME 

 

It means annoying or irritating

 

If the dog becomes irksome, please do bring him home. 

 

Anonyms: pleasant

Synonyms: irritating, annoying

 

It comes from the middle English and old Norse 'irk' meaning annoying. 

 

14th December 

English word of the week - VISCOUS 

It means a liquid which is thick and sticky 

 

The honey was viscous. 

 

Etymology: late Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French viscous, from Latin viscum  -birdlime made from mistletoe berries.  

 

Synonyms: thickstickygooey 

Antonyms: watery, fluid 

7th December 

English word of the week - RANCID 

 

It means having an unpleasant stale taste or smell as the result of decomposition.

 

Yuck! This butter is rancid! 

 

Etymology: C17: from Latin rancidus rank, from rancÄ“re to stink 

 

Synoyms: moldy, putrid, sour 

Antonyms : pure, sweet, fresh

 

 

Math word of the week - DECREASE

 

This means to get smaller

 

30th November
English word of the week - PLETHORA 

 

Meaning a large amount of something. 

 

The library had a plethora of books. 

 

Synonyms: many, myriad

Antonyms: few 

 

Etymology: it comes from the Greek plethian meaning full. 

 

 

Math word of the week - INCREASE 

 

meaning when an amount gets larger

 

Synonyms: bigger

Antonyms: decrease, fewer

 

23rd November
English word of the week - CANTANKEROUS 

 

Meaning bad tempered, moody and difficult to deal with.

 

The dog became very cantankerous when it didn't get its favourite meal.

 

Synonyms : bad tempered, grumpy

Antonyms : happy, chilled 

 

Etymology: Experts are still not sure where this word came from!

 

 

Math word of the week - INTEGER 

 

meaning a whole number - it does not have a fractional part. 

 

Please find the integer between 5 and 7. 

 

It comes from the Latin word Integer meaning whole. 

16th November
English word of the week - UNIQUE

 

It means, to be one of a kind.

We are all unique in our own way. 

Synonyms : individual, special.

Antonyms: same.

 

Etymology: it comes from the Latin 'unus' meaning one.

 

Math word of the week - COMMON

 

It means to be shared or done often. Belonging to two or more quantities. 

Find the common factors of 20 and 45. 

Synonyms: regular, frequent.

Antonyms: rare, unusual.

 

9th November 
English word of the week - PLEAD 

 

 

Meaning to beg in an emotional way.

 

On bended knees the Knight pleaded for forgiveness. 

 

Synonyms - beg, implore, beseech

 

Antonyms - refuse

 

Etymology - it comes from the Old French word 'plaid' meaning to discuss. 

 

 

Math Word of the week - CENTI 

 

Word beginning with centi have something to do with 100. 

 

There are 100 centimetres in 1 metre. 

 

It comes from the Latin 'Centum' meaning 100. 

 

 

2nd November
English word of the week - ACCEPTANCE

 

Meaning: the acceptance of somebody into a group means to think of them as part of the group and to act in a friendly way. 

 

To be able to tolerate people or situations. 

 

Synonyms: tolerate

 

Antonyms: rejection 

 

We show acceptance of everybody in our community. 

 

 

Math word of the week - CALCULATE

 

 

Meaning: to find an amount or number using maths. 

 

Please calculate the answers. 

 

Synonyms: work out 

 

Etymology: it comes from the Latin word calculus meaning to work out using numbers. 

 

19th October
English word of the week - GLIMPSE 

 

 

Meaning to look quickly at something.

 

I took a glimpse of the blurb- it looks great!

 

Synonyms - glance, peek

 

Antonyms - Stare, gaze

 

It comes from the 1500 word glimpse - meaning to glace with your eyes.

 

 

Math word of the week - ASCEND 

 

 

Meaning to go from smallest to largest.

 

I would like you to put the numbers in ascending order.

 

Antonyms - descend

 

It comes from the Latin word ascendere meaning to move upwards. 

 

12th October
English word of the week - MULTIRACIAL 

 

 

Meaning people of different races.

 

 

England is a multiracial country.

 

 

It comes from 

Multi meaning many

racial meaning one of the major groups which human beings can be divided into according to their physical features, such as the colour of their skin.
 
 
Math word of the week - PRODUCT 
 
The answer when two values are multiplied together. 
 
Please find the product of the values.
5th October 
English word of the week - CLAMBER
Meaning to climb using both feet and hands with difficulty.  

With difficultly, I had to clamber over the mountainous pile of clothes.  

 

Synonyms: scramble, climb 

Antonyms: Fall, get down, descend 

 

 

Math word of the week - DIGIT
 
A digit is a written symbol for any of the ten numbers from 0 to 9.
 
In maths, we must put one digit in each box.
28th September
English word of the week - COMPASSION 

 

 

Meaning a feeling of deep sympathy and sorrow for another who is stricken by misfortune 

 

I felt such compassion towards the caged monkey.  

 

Synonyms: Empathy, grace 

Antonyms: harsh, cruel 

 

It comes from

the old French, compassion, meaning pity and sympathy.  

 

 

Math word of the week - INTEGER

meaning a whole number

 

 

The children named each integer up to 100.

 

 

Synonyms - numbers, digits.

 

21st September
English word of the week - WITHERED
Meaning shrivelled up and drooping 

 

A single tear slid down the girl's face as she looked at the withered tree.

 

Synonyms - wilted, drooping, faded.

Antonyms - Thriving, flourishing.

 

It comes from the middle English word 'wydderen' meaning to dry up.

 

 

 

Math word of the week - SUM 
 

Meaning when you need to add two or more numbers together

 

Find the sum of 34 and 56.

 

Synonyms : add, plus

Antonyms : subtract, take away

 

14th September
English word of the week - DEVOURED

 

Meaning to eat with speed

 

I devoured the chocolate cake. 

Synonyms: chomped, gobbled

Antonyms: nibble 

 

It comes from the Latin, de meaning down and vorare meaning to swallow. 

 

 

 

Math word of the week - INFINITE

 

Meaning to be continued indefinitely 

The number sequence was infinite 

 

It comes from the Latin; in meaning not and fintus meaning finished 

 

7th September 
English word of the week - RETURN 

 

Meaning:  to come back

 

The children were all due to come back to school. 

Synonyms: come back

Antonyms: leave, exit 

 

It comes from the Latin re meaning back. 

 

 

Math word of the week - ANGLE

 

Meaning a space between two intersecting points. 

The angle measured 90 degrees. 

 

It comes from the Latin angulus meaning corner

 

16th March
Word of the week - VERTICAL

 

Meaning: straight up and down 

 

It comes from Latin verticalis meaning "overhead"
 
Antonyms: horizontal 
9th March
Word of the week - HORIZONTAL

 

Meaning: parallel to the horizon.

 

It comes from the Latin ‘horizontalis’ meaning the horizon.

 

The boy laid horizontal on the floor. 

 

Antonyms: vertical

Synonyms: level, even

 

2nd March
Word of the week - PARALLEL 

 

Meaning: When the sides or lines are side by side, the distance between them remains the same, they will never meet. 

 

It comes from Greek parallÄ“los meaning besides one another. 
 
The tracks lay parallel, never meeting.
The teacher asked me to draw a pair of parallel lines. 
 
Synonyms : aligned, side by side
Antonyms: divergent
24th February Word of the week - QUADRILATERAL

Meaning:  A shape with 4 sides.

Quad comes from the Latin of 4.
Lateral comes from the Latin side.

10th February
Word of the week - GRAND 

 

Meaning: Magnificent, important or large. 
 

It comes from the old french ‘me grand’ meaning of the highest importance. 
 

Synonyms: marvellous, noble, stately

Antonyms: bad, common, small
 

3rd February
Word of the week - NOON

 

Meaning : Midday 

 

At noon we have our lunch. 

 

Etymology: comes from the Latin, nona hora which means the ninth hour after sunrise. Therefore, originally noon was around 3pm. 

 

Synonyms: midday 

Antonyms: midnight

 

27th January
Word of the week - COURTEOUS

 

Meaning: polite and respectful.

 

Pakefield primary students are always courteous at our school.

 

Etymology: comes from the Old French 'curteis' meaning elegant manners. 

 

Synonyms: well mannered; respectful; polite

Antonyms: rude

 

20th January
Word of the week - CHRONOLOGICAL

 

Meaning: following an order of time, or from when events happened.

 

'Please give me the dates in chronological order'.

 

Etymology:

It comes from the Greek 'chronos' meaning time.

 

Synonyms: sequenced, in order.

Antonyms: Muddled.

 

13th January
Word of the week - VAST

 

Meaning immense, being of great size. 

 

She had a vast amount of knowledge.

 

It comes from the Latin 'vastus' meaning huge. 

 

Synonyms: Huge, extensive, wide.

Antonyms: tiny, small amount.

 

7th January
Word of the week - MONOTONOUS

 

Meaning: dull, tedious, lacking in variety, the same.

 

The wasteland's scenery was monotonous; mile after mile of red dusk littered the landscape.

 

It comes from the root 'Mono' in Greek. It means one, alone, the same.

 

Some examples of this:

Monarch, monocle, monopoly, monorail, monotone, monologue.

 

Synonyms : Dull, tedious

Antonyms: Varied, interesting, exciting.

 

16th December

Word of the week - EXOTIC

Meaning: unusual and exciting because of coming (or seeming to come) from far away, especially a tropical country.

The exotic foods were delicious.

Etymology:
It comes from the Greek root word exo- meaning outside.
Please discuss the root word exo and words with this prefix - exoskeleton, exothermic etc.

Synonyms : unique, unusual
Antonyms: familiar

 

9th December

Word of the week - INQUISITIVE  

 

Meaning: having or showing an interest in learning things; curious.

 

Etymology:

from Late Latin inquisitivus "making inquiry, or to seek information'.

Quis means to seek in Latin. This can be found in:

acquisition, exquisite, inquisition.

 

Suffix: 

 

inquisitively, adverb

inquisitiveness, noun

2nd December 

Word of the week - SERENDIPITY 

Meaning a happy accident. Or when you find something valuable by chance.

Nature has created wonderful serendipity.

It comes from:

The old English tale in 1754: coined by Horace Walpole, suggested by The Three Princes of Serendip, the title of a fairy tale in which the heroes ‘were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of’.

Synonym- happy accident

Suffixes-

Serendipitous - a serendipitous event

 

25th November

Words of the week - DUSK and DAWN.

Dusk:
When it starts to get dark.

It comes from the old English ‘dosc’ which means to obscure.

Synonyms- sundown, sunset, twilight.

Dawn:
The first appearance of light.

It comes from the old English dauen which means to become day.

Synonyms: daybreak

 

18th November 

Word of the week - OMINOUS

Meaning: suggesting something unpleasant/ threatening or evil is going to happen.

The clouds looks ominous as they rolled over the  stormy sea.

Etymology- it comes from the Latin omen.

Synonym - menacing, threatening.

Suffix- ly

 

11th November

As it is anti bullying week, we thought this word would work well:

Word of the week - CONSIDERATE

Meaning to show careful thought or to take care not to harm others.

It comes from:
The Latin, consideratus - to look closely.

Suffix - ly
Prefix- in

Synonym - thoughtful, mindful
Antonym - inconsiderate

 

4th November 

Word of the week - MYRIAD

Meaning many things

Etymology:
It comes from the Greek murioi, meaning 10,000 or countless

Synonyms:
Countless, boundless, infinite

 

28th October 

Word of the week - ASTRONOMICALLY

 

Meaning - very large / immense. 

 

Its root word is astronomy.

Suffix - ical.

 

It comes from the old Greek astronomos. 

Astro = star 

Nomos = arranging

 

14th October
Word of the week - INTRIGUE

 

Meaning: If something, especially something strange, intrigues you, it interests you and you want to know more. 

 

It comes from:

 The Old french intriguer  - to trick
The Latin intrigare - to muddle

 

Suffixes - ed and ing

 

Synonyms - engross, captivate

Antonyms - bore

 

7th October 
Word of the week - PERPLEXED

 

Meaning to be completely baffled and confused. 

 

It comes from the Latin - perplexus. 

 

Per - meaning through

Plexus - meaning entangled 

 

So put them together you have to work 'through' 'entangled' thoughts when you are perplexed

 

30th September
Word of the week - AMBLE

 

Meaning to walk at a slow and relaxed pace.

 

Amble comes from:

Old French ambler meaning : go steady

 and 

Latin ambulare meaning : to take a walk

 

23rd September

Word of the week - PERSEVERANCE

 

When you keep on trying even though you may be finding it tricky.

 

Perseverance comes from the Latin persevereus.

 

‘Per’ meaning very

‘Severeus’ meaning strict.

 

Therefore you must be very strict with yourself to never give up

 

 

 

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